Bedtime media use translates to less sleep for some children – News-Medical.Net

We discovered a strong association in between media usage in the hour prior to bed and when these kids went to sleep and how long they slept. Media usage before bed was not associated with the sleep of kids who scored high on measures of effortful control.”

According to a research study from the Arizona State University Department of Psychology, media use in the hour preceding bedtime effects how kids sleep, specifically kids who have a hard time to self-regulate their habits. Frequent media usage before bed in these kids anticipated later bedtimes and less sleep. The work is now readily available online in Psychological Science.

Examined by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Jun 23 2020
For some children, screen time before bed translates to less sleep.

Leah Doane, associate professor of psychology at ASU and senior author on the paper

The research study group invested a week following 547 kids, aged 7-9 years. The individual group was socioeconomically varied and resided in metropolitan and rural locations. The parents kept daily diaries that tracked the kidss media use and sleep patterns. They likewise completed a study that asked about their childrens character, including their capability to self-regulate habits.

Children with low effortful control might battle with changing their attention from watching media prior to bed to relaxing down and falling asleep. But due to the fact that effortful control is a personality characteristic, it is more challenging to alter.

According to a research study from the Arizona State University Department of Psychology, media use in the hour preceding bedtime impacts how kids sleep, particularly kids who have a hard time to self-regulate their behavior. Regular media usage before bed in these kids forecasted later bedtimes and less sleep. We discovered a strong association in between media use in the hour prior to bed and when these kids went to sleep and how long they slept. The kids who scored low on measures of effortful control slept the least amount of time when they consistently utilized media in the hour before bed throughout the study week. Media usage prior to bed did not impact the sleep of children who scored high on effortful control, which was approximately 35 percent of the study participants.

“Instead of moms and dads wondering how to assist their kid much better regulate their behavior, they can try to focus on developing more constant sleep and media use schedules,” Doane stated.
Source: Journal referral: Clifford, S., et al. (2020) Effortful Control Moderates the Relation Between Electronic-Media Use and Objective Sleep Indicators in Childhood. Mental Science. doi.org/10.1177/0956797620919432.

For the entire week, the children wore specialized wrist watches called actigraphs that tracked their movement and likewise ambient light. When and how long the children slept, the actigraph data provided the research group detailed info about.

” Media usage was generally associated with a shorter sleep duration, but this result was most pronounced in kids with low effortful control,” said Sierra Clifford, a research study scientist at ASU and first author on the paper. “The impact of media on sleep was likewise an average affect, implying that it shows regular media use rather than periodically keeping up late to view a movie.”

The kids who scored low on steps of effortful control slept the least amount of time when they consistently used media in the hour prior to bed throughout the study week. These kids slept around 40 minutes less per night. Media use prior to bed did not affect the sleep of kids who scored high up on effortful control, which was around 35 percent of the study individuals.

The kids slept an average of 8 hours a night and utilized media prior to bed for approximately 5 nights during the research study week. Children who did not use media prior to bed during the study week slept 23 minutes more and went to sleep 34 minutes earlier than kids who used media most nights throughout the research study week.

“Media direct exposure mattered for the kids who determined least expensive in effortful control,” Clifford stated.